Job Opportunity For Junior / Trainee CAD Technician

A job role has just opened up for a young person to join our expanding company.

We are ideally looking for someone who is just about to finish school or embarking on a career change, is local and is very eager to learn. Ideally applicants should have a small amount of previous CAD experience. However this is not essential as successful applicants will recieve on-the-job training to develop and enhance your skills and knowledge.

Philip Hammond’s vision to build 300,000 more houses in the UK each year is a major step in tackling the country’s housing crisis, and the construction sector will rise to this challenge, says Steve Cooper, General Manager at Aconex, the construction mana

However, it’s vital that this wave of new housebuilding hits tight budget and timing targets, as these have been an enduring problem for too long in our industry. Indeed, a national programme of new housebuilding needs to take account of how the sector must continue to work at overcoming problems of low productivity and build quality.

Construction is famously weak on productivity. While other core markets such as banking or retail have carried out digital transformation to keep pace with consumer demand, the construction industry has fallen behind. Low productivity equates to low output, late project delivery, reduced profits and costly delays. Magnifying the situation is the unpredictability of the construction sector, which is seen in its structural and leadership fragmentation, low margins, adversarial pricing models and financial fragility. Add to this picture an apparent lack of a collaboration and improvement culture and an often-dysfunctional training, funding and delivery model, and it is clear why the problem is so ingrained.

But the industry is not damaged beyond rescue. All markets have their difficulties, and the construction industry has the ability and the capacity to become as fast-paced as others. It simply requires the right facilitators to achieve its goals. Improving productivity, even by a small percentage, will lead to better built assets, delivered on time and on budget, and more profitable contracts.

While the sector is being asked to enable more citizens to get the homes of their dreams sooner rather than later, greater digitisation across all facets of the construction sector, small and large, should be encouraged – as the government does in other parts of the economy. Productivity will come when the industry as a whole takes major steps towards digitisation. When this is used to create a single platform and source of information about a project or across a programme, construction workers will be more productive and saving time and money through greater team collaboration.

Digital technologies can make organisations better at managing change. But first, project owners need to build entire teams that possess digital competencies. Re-orienting an organisation to become digitally savvy is no small feat, but it can be accomplished by developing individuals with relevant digital skills and building upon an organisation’s technological capabilities.

It is encouraging to see the Chancellor recognising the importance of training to fill the construction skills gap. The £34M allocation should spur the conversation around how we can get more digital skills developed in the construction sector. Furthermore, the newly announced Construction Sector Deal has stated that it will help modernise the industry and recruit and train the next generation of high-skilled construction workers. Having the talent to be able to harness the latest digital innovations in collaboration, on & off-site fabrication, project control and supply chain management can transform the construction process, reversing what have been the accepted norms of construction projects: shooting overbudget and coming in late. Investing in digital construction skills, therefore, can play a crucial part in delivering the overall goals of the ambitious national housebuilding programmes.

Digitally-skilled employees can leverage numerous existing collaboration technologies designed to improve productivity. These collaboration platforms can be used to improve the design, engineering and construction process by integrating working practices and project communications across the wide range of disciplines and supply chains. What this facilitates is the ability to optimise working practices, which is c

Philip Hammond’s vision to build 300,000 more houses in the UK each year is a major step in tackling the country’s housing crisis, and the construction sector will rise to this challenge, says Steve Cooper, General Manager at Aconex, the construction management platform.

However, it’s vital that this wave of new housebuilding hits tight budget and timing targets, as these have been an enduring problem for too long in our industry. Indeed, a national programme of new housebuilding needs to take account of how the sector must continue to work at overcoming problems of low productivity and build quality.

Construction is famously weak on productivity. While other core markets such as banking or retail have carried out digital transformation to keep pace with consumer demand, the construction industry has fallen behind. Low productivity equates to low output, late project delivery, reduced profits and costly delays. Magnifying the situation is the unpredictability of the construction sector, which is seen in its structural and leadership fragmentation, low margins, adversarial pricing models and financial fragility. Add to this picture an apparent lack of a collaboration and improvement culture and an often-dysfunctional training, funding and delivery model, and it is clear why the problem is so ingrained.

But the industry is not damaged beyond rescue. All markets have their difficulties, and the construction industry has the ability and the capacity to become as fast-paced as others. It simply requires the right facilitators to achieve its goals. Improving productivity, even by a small percentage, will lead to better built assets, delivered on time and on budget, and more profitable contracts.

While the sector is being asked to enable more citizens to get the homes of their dreams sooner rather than later, greater digitisation across all facets of the construction sector, small and large, should be encouraged – as the government does in other parts of the economy. Productivity will come when the industry as a whole takes major steps towards digitisation. When this is used to create a single platform and source of information about a project or across a programme, construction workers will be more productive and saving time and money through greater team collaboration.

Digital technologies can make organisations better at managing change. But first, project owners need to build entire teams that possess digital competencies. Re-orienting an organisation to become digitally savvy is no small feat, but it can be accomplished by developing individuals with relevant digital skills and building upon an organisation’s technological capabilities.

It is encouraging to see the Chancellor recognising the importance of training to fill the construction skills gap. The £34M allocation should spur the conversation around how we can get more digital skills developed in the construction sector. Furthermore, the newly announced Construction Sector Deal has stated that it will help modernise the industry and recruit and train the next generation of high-skilled construction workers. Having the talent to be able to harness the latest digital innovations in collaboration, on & off-site fabrication, project control and supply chain management can transform the construction process, reversing what have been the accepted norms of construction projects: shooting overbudget and coming in late. Investing in digital construction skills, therefore, can play a crucial part in delivering the overall goals of the ambitious national housebuilding programmes.

Digitally-skilled employees can leverage numerous existing collaboration technologies designed to improve productivity. These collaboration platforms can be used to improve the design, engineering and construction process by integrating working practices and project communications across the wide range of disciplines and supply chains. What this facilitates is the ability to optimise working practices, which is crucial for productivity.

Designers and constructors must work together to design for optimal construction. Utilising improved processes designed around building information modelling (BIM) offers them the ability to capture and structure vast amounts of data around projects and assets, enabling businesses to improve decisions and processes. With the increased level of data now being captured, managed and assimilated, BIM is helping the industry implement new working practices, communication processes and control functions. Embracing many of BIM’s 4D & 5D capabilities also cuts costs and saves time from the start of a project so that teams can work more effectively from the get-go.

Sadiq Khan is ready to ‘rip up’ planning rules in challenging housebuilders to develop affordable housing sites at higher densities to substantially increase capacity in London

In a major housing policy in his new draft London Plan – launched today (November 29) – Khan said out-dated construction constraints and rigid density guidelines have had their day.

In the new draft London Plan, Sadiq Khan has set out how he will ask homebuilders to maximise the use of valuable land in the city – and that means developing sites with more homes on them than existing developments nearby that would have had to follow previous guidelines.

Khan believes increased numbers of homes should be built on sites near town centres or good public transport, reducing the need for car parking spaces within developments.

The mayor’s plan states proposed development on sites that do not maximise housing density should be refused.

Instead, the future has councils working with developers and housing associations taking a case-by-case approach to each site to determine its capacity based on surrounding infrastructure.

The new policy also emphasises the importance of good design and will be applicable to buildings of all types, including low-rise, medium and high-rise.

This approach is supported by a stronger policy on housing standards, including minimum space standards, which sets out how a home should be designed.

While Khan is encouraging homebuilders to make the best use of land in the capital, he expects councils to refuse any applications that come forward with homes that do not meet his new standards.

The draft also includes the mayor’s key strategic housing commitment for 50% of all new homes built to be genuinely affordable – to be achieved through planning, investment and building on public land.

It strengthens his new approach offering private developers a fast-track route to planning permission if they reach a minimum of 35% affordable.

New ambitious targets have been set for councils across the capital, as part of an overall London Plan figure of 65,000 homes a year – around double the current rate of homebuilding.

For the first timeIn a major housing policy in his new draft London Plan – launched today (November 29) – Khan said out-dated construction constraints and rigid density guidelines have had their day.

In the new draft London Plan, Sadiq Khan has set out how he will ask homebuilders to maximise the use of valuable land in the city – and that means developing sites with more homes on them than existing developments nearby that would have had to follow previous guidelines.

Khan believes increased numbers of homes should be built on sites near town centres or good public transport, reducing the need for car parking spaces within developments.

The mayor’s plan states proposed development on sites that do not maximise housing density should be refused.

Instead, the future has councils working with developers and housing associations taking a case-by-case approach to each site to determine its capacity based on surrounding infrastructure.

The new policy also emphasises the importance of good design and will be applicable to buildings of all types, including low-rise, medium and high-rise.

This approach is supported by a stronger policy on housing standards, including minimum space standards, which sets out how a home should be designed.

While Khan is encouraging homebuilders to make the best use of land in the capital, he expects councils to refuse any applications that come forward with homes that do not meet his new standards.

The draft also includes the mayor’s key strategic housing commitment for 50% of all new homes built to be genuinely affordable – to be achieved through planning, investment and building on public land.

It strengthens his new approach offering private developers a fast-track route to planning permission if they reach a minimum of 35% affordable.

New ambitious targets have been set for councils across the capital, as part of an overall London Plan figure of 65,000 homes a year – around double the current rate of homebuilding.

For the first time, targets in the plan show how capacity can also be reached on small sites, which must now make a significant contribution to housing supply.

Khan believes there is capacity for 24,500 homes a year on London’s small sites – typically those between one and 25 homes., targets in the plan show how capacity can also be reached on small sites, which must now make a significant contribution to housing supply.

Khan believes there is capacity for 24,500 homes a year on London’s small sites – typically those between one and 25 homes.

Brexit: UK construction industry facing 'cliff edge' due to EU departure

The UK construction industry has warned that the sector faces a Brexit ‘cliff edge’ if the Government doesn't provide more details on its plans to implement a two-year grace period for EU citizens looking to apply for settled status after the split.

A report jointly published by seven of the construction industry’s largest trade bodies on Wednesday, sets out the sector’s responsibilities and requirements in a post-Brexit labour market. 

It calls on the Government to implement a post-transitional migration system based on key occupations where workers are in short supply, rather than on what it calls “arbitrary thresholds based on skill levels or income”.

“We know we need to step up as an industry and train more home-grown talent but we also have to be realistic about the future,” said Brian Berry, chief executive of the federation. “There will continue to be some ongoing need for migrant workers and our post-Brexit migration rules will need to be fit for purpose.”The Federation of Master Builders said the decision to leave the EU had left the UK construction industry facing a “cliff edge” in terms of its access to EU workers.

But Wednesday’s report calls on the Government to provide greater detail of its proposals, giving EU nationals more certainty about their future.Earlier this month, the Government released a technical paper outlining the details of a two-year grace period for EU nationals to apply for settled status once the UK leaves the bloc so they can remain in the UK.

“Without the skills that many EU nationals bring to the industry, we could be facing severe setbacks to the UK’s national infrastructure pipeline,” said Nelson Ogunshakin, chief executive of the Association for Consultancy and Engineering.  

He said that there has already been an increase in the number EU staff leaving the UK for jobs on the continent.

“This will only get worse if we do not bring certainty to EU workers’ residency rights,” he added.  

Construction represents 10 per cent of total UK employment, according to the report, and is a key driver of employment and economic growth across the country. According to figures from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), 8 per cent of the workforce in the UK construction sector stems from EU countries outside of the UK.

Critics have warned that the lack of clarity from the Government regarding its post-Brexit immigration policy could threaten major infrastructure projects.

John Slaughter, director of external affairs at the Home Builders Federation, said: “With the Budget having confirmed a target to deliver 300,000 homes a year by the mid-2020s, home builders will need to continue to bring more skilled people into the industry.

“To deliver the national social and economic necessity of an improved housing supply we will also continue to need access to foreign workers under a manageable migration system.”